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Multiculturalism In Europe Has Failed -- What A Surprise


By Gary Starr for the Neville Awards
Feb. 15, 2011


  • Political Correctness (Code for thought, speech and behavioral control by the Left)
  • Social and Environmental Justice (Code for wealth redistribution form the haves to the have-nots - legalized theft)
  • Multiculturalism (Code for forced societal diversity designed dilute and erase society's norms and traditions - the goal is to destroy Western Civilization.
After 40 years of watching Europe Canada and the United States fall prey to these 3 Leftist evils, three leaders in Europe may be coming to their senses.

Great Britain

British Prime Minister David Cameron speaking at a Feb. 2011 Munich Security Conference .

[T]he biggest threat that we face comes from terrorist attacks, some of which are, sadly, carried out by our own citizens. . . .

Under the doctrine of state multiculturalism, we have encouraged different cultures to live separate lives, apart from each other and apart from the mainstream. We've failed to provide a vision of society to which they feel they want to belong. We've even tolerated these segregated communities behaving in ways that run completely counter to our values.

So, when a white person holds objectionable views, racist views for instance, we rightly condemn them. But when equally unacceptable views or practices come from someone who isn't white, we've been too cautious frankly-frankly, even fearful-to stand up to them. . . .

Some organizations that seek to present themselves as a gateway to the Muslim community are showered with public money despite doing little to combat extremism. As others have observed, this is like turning to a right-wing fascist party to fight a violent white supremacist movement. So we should properly judge these organizations: do they believe in universal human rights-including for women and people of other faiths? Do they believe in equality of all before the law? Do they believe in democracy and the right of people to elect their own government? Do they encourage integration or separation? . . . Fail these tests and the presumption should be not to engage with organizations-so, no public money, no sharing of platforms with ministers at home.

At the same time, we must stop these groups from reaching people in publicly-funded institutions like universities or even, in the British case, prisons. Now, some say, this is not compatible with free speech and intellectual inquiry. Well, I say, would you take the same view if these were right-wing extremists recruiting on our campuses? Would you advocate inaction if Christian fundamentalists who believed that Muslims are the enemy were leading prayer groups in our prisons? And to those who say these non-violent extremists are actually helping to keep young, vulnerable men away from violence, I say nonsense. . . .

Frankly, we need a lot less of the passive tolerance of recent years and a much more active, muscular liberalism. A passively tolerant society says to its citizens, as long as you obey the law we will just leave you alone. It stands neutral between different values. But I believe a genuinely liberal country does much more; it believes in certain values and actively promotes them. Freedom of speech, freedom of worship, democracy, the rule of law, equal rights regardless of race, sex or sexuality. It says to its citizens, this is what defines us as a society: to belong here is to believe in these things. Now, each of us in our own countries, I believe, must be unambiguous and hard-nosed about this defence of our liberty.


Germany

German Chancellor, Angela Merkel, has courted growing anti-immigrant opinion in Germany by claiming the country's attempts to create a multicultural society have "utterly failed".

In Potsdam, speaking to a meeting of young members of her Christian Democratic Union party on October 17, 2010 , Merkel said the idea of people from different cultural backgrounds living happily "side by side" did not work.

"This [multicultural] approach has failed, utterly failed," Merkel told the meeting in Potsdam, west of Berlin, yesterday.

Merkel said the onus was on immigrants to do more to integrate into German society and that too little had been required of immigrants in the past and repeated her argument that they should learn German in order to cope in school and take advantage of opportunities in the labour market.

One recent poll showed the following:
  • one-third of Germans believed the country was "overrun by foreigners".
  • 55% of Germans believed that Arabs are "unpleasant people", compared with the 44% who held the opinion seven years ago.
In her speech, Merkel said the education of unemployed Germans should take priority over recruiting workers from abroad, while noting that Germany could not get by without skilled foreign workers.

France

On Feb. 11, 2011 French President Nicolas Sarkozy declared, in a nationally televised debate that multiculturalism was a "failure," warning that such a concept fostered extremism.

"We have been too concerned about the identity of the person who was arriving and not enough about the identity of the country that was receiving him," Sarkozy said.

The French leader said that France should be a place with a national community - not a place where different cultural communities just coexist.

"Our Muslim compatriots must be able to practice their religion, as any citizen can," Sarkozy said. "But we in France do not want people to pray in an ostentatious way in the street."

"'If you come to France, you accept to melt into a single community, which is the national community," he continued. "And if you do not want to accept that, you cannot be welcome in France".

Dorothy Rabinowitz, writing in the Wall St. Journal, says it best and ties it to the Maj. Nidal Hasan (the U.S. Army jihadist who murdered 13 soldiers) case in November 2009. In it's initial report, the Army made no mention of his Islamist ties.

There can be no underestimating the in-so-many-words aspect of these renunciations. This was multiculturalism they were talking about—the unofficial established religion of the universities, the faith whose requirements have shaped every aspect of cultural, economic and political life in Western democracies for the last 50 years. Read Rabinowitz's full article

Also From the Wall St. Journal:

Cameron's Multicultural Wake-Up Call
by DOUGLAS MURRAY
FEBRUARY 9, 2011
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB40001424052
748704364004576131940794840176.html


The growth of Islamist extremism in the West is something even the politically correct can no longer ignore.

Finally, Europe's mainstream party leaders seem to be realizing what others have long noticed: Multiculturalism has been the most pernicious and divisive policy pursued by Western governments since World War II.

People were led to believe that "multiculturalism" meant multiracialism, or pluralism. It did not. Nevertheless, for years anybody who criticized multiculturalism was immediately decried as a "racist." It judged that the state should not "impose" rules and values on newcomers. Rather, it should bend over backwards to accommodate the demands of immigrants. The resultant policy was that states treated and judged people by the criteria of whatever "community" they found themselves born into.

In Britain, for instance, this meant that if you were a white English girl born into a white English family and your family decided to marry you against your will to a randy old pervert, the state would intervene. But if you had the misfortune to be born into an "Asian-background" family and the same happened, then the state would look the other way. The multicultural model may have continued a lot longer if it hadn't been for radical Islam. The terrorist assaults and plots across Britain and Europe-often from home-grown extremists-provided a breaking point that few sentient people could ignore. The question now is what can be done.

In his speech in Munich, Mr. Cameron rightly focused on the problem of home-grown Islamic extremism. He stressed several preliminary steps-among them that groups whose values are opposed to those of the state will no longer be bestowed with taxpayer money. It is a symptom of how low we have sunk that ceasing to fund our societies' opponents would constitute an improvement.

But this is a first, not a final, policy. The fact is that Britain, Germany, Holland and many other European countries have nurtured more than one generation of citizens who seem to feel no loyalty toward their country and who, on the contrary, often seem to despise it.

The first step forward is that from school-age upward our societies must reassert a shared national narrative-including a common national culture. Some years ago the German Muslim writer Bassam Tibi coined the term "Leitkultur"-core culture-to describe this. It is the most decent and properly liberal antidote to multiculturalism. It concedes that in societies that have had high immigration there are all sorts of different cultures-which will only work together if they are united by a common theme.

The Muslim communities that Mr. Cameron focused on will not reform themselves. So the British government will have to shut down and prosecute terrorist and extremist organizations, including some "charities." There are groups that are banned in the U.S. but can and do still operate with charitable status in the U.K. Clerics and other individuals who come from abroad to preach hate and division should be deported.

Will Mr. Cameron manage to do any of this? There is reason to be skeptical. In the wake of the 2005 subway and bus bombings in London-attacks carried out by British-born Muslims-Tony Blair announced that "the rules of the game are changing." They then stayed the same.

It is possible that Mr. Cameron will show more political courage. If he does, he will undoubtedly be lambasted by the defenders of multiculturalism. He will also become a leader of significance. If he doesn't, then future generations may well associate him with Munich. But it will not be for Saturday's speech. It will be with a previous prime minister who also went to that city and who returned with an honor that proved deeply temporary.

Mr. Murray is director of the Center for Social Cohesion in London.
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